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Falling Apart

America's Infrastructure In Need of Repair

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Policy Recommendations for a Long-Term Infrastructure Plan

Building America’s Future believes that a strong and vibrant infrastructure is essential to keeping America competitive, to improving our public safety and to enhancing the quality of life for every American.

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Gas Tax

30 states have passed gas tax increases since 2013.

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Building America's Future 2020 Vision

In order to get the country on the best path forward we need a strong vision and a long-term infrastructure strategy. Building America’s Future is optimistic about the possibilities, now and in the decades to come, and will continue to encourage visionary leadership that ensures America’s place as the world’s technological leader and preeminent global economic power.

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Building America's Future and US Travel Association Survey

On May 22, 2014, Building America's Future (BAF) and the US Travel Association (USTA) released the results of a survey of USTA members.  This survey shows that global competitiveness and economic and job growth are all severely imperiled by the United States’ collapsing transportation infrastructure.

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Falling Apart and Falling Behind

Falling Apart and Falling Behind lays out the economic challenges posed by our ailing infrastructure, provides a comparative look at the smart investments being made by our international competitors, and suggests a series of recommendations for Congress to begin to build on MAP-21 and craft new innovative transportation policies in the U.S

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Facts and Quotes

The quality of U.S. road infrastructure ranks 17th in the world behind such countries as Singapore.  This is up from 11th in 2018.
America must invest $472.6 billion in drinking water systems over the next 20 years to maintain a safe supply for millions of Americans.
Much of the U.S. energy system predates the turn of the 20th century.  Most electric transmission and distribution lines were constructed in the1950s and 1960s with a life expectancy of 50 years and the more than 640,000 miles of high-voltage transmission lines in the lower 48 states' power grids are at full capacity.