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Between 2003 and 2012, roughly 679 power outages, each affecting at least 50,000 customers, occurred due to weather events.
The grid delivers electricity to more than 144 million end-use customers in the United States.
The grid connects Americans with 5,800 major power plants and includes over 450,000 miles of high voltage transmission lines.
The United States is home to thousands of power generating plants and systems and more than 640,000 miles of electric transmission lines.
America has 2.6 million miles of oil and gas pipelines.
Americans consume 26 percent of the world’s energy.
Rolling blackouts and electrical grid inefficiencies cost an estimated $80 billion a year.
Retrofitting public buildings to be greener would create as many as 800,000 jobs.
Moving freight by rail instead of trucks reduces greenhouse gas emissions an average of 75 percent.
The Federal Highway Administration estimates that 25 percent of congestion is attributable to traffic incidents, around half of which are crashes. According to a study published by the Eno Center for Transportation, a 10 percent autonomous vehicle market penetration rate would result in an estimated 15 percent decrease in freeway congestion delays for all vehicles, mostly due to smoothed flow and bottleneck reductions.
According to a University of California, Berkeley study power outages account for roughly $80 billion annually in total losses to communities across the U.S. Based on that calculation, the Electric Power Board (EPB) of Chattanooga estimates that community losses in its service area are roughly $105 million annually. However, due to its SmartGrid Chattanooga has achieved outage reductions of 60%, saving the community $50 million or more each year in lost productivity, lost product, and lost sales.
A Department of Energy (DOE) smart grid demonstration project in Olympic Peninsula, Washington found that consumers save 10 percent on their utility bills.